Stravinsky: Classic Humanist

Stravinsky: Classic Humanist

Stravinsky: Classic Humanist

Stravinsky: Classic Humanist

Excerpt

With the rise of romanticism at the beginning of the nineteenth century a fundamental change occured in the relationship of the composer to his environment. Up to that time he had been subjected to a higher order determined by church and nobility. Commissioned by these agencies, he had created his works for the praise of God or that of his aristocratic patron, often not only a "lover" but also a "connoisseur" of the "science" of music. The subject matter of music, just as that of painting, remained fixed, with each epoch creating its own conventions and formulae for artistic realization. Therefore differentiations but of style exist between the late Gothic music of the fifteenth century and the Baroque of the eighteenth. Intellectual and sociological attitudes of these periods are identical. At all times individuality was subjugated to a superior order accepted without question.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.