Principles of Field and Mining Geology

Principles of Field and Mining Geology

Principles of Field and Mining Geology

Principles of Field and Mining Geology

Excerpt

The basic purpose of this book is to present an analysis of geological field techniques which will function as a working guide for the approach, pursuit, and solution of geological problems, particularly those of mining geology. It is the author's hope that not only will the book acquaint students with proper field procedures, but that it also will afford a convenient reference for practicing geologists. The book has not been written for use by one who is just beginning his study of geology and engineering, but the presentation is founded upon the premise that the field man has acquired the elementary principles of geology and mineralogy.

Geological field work is undertaken primarily to determine the manner of occurence, the distribution, and the extent of materials of the earth's crust. In fact, field observation is the foundation upon which the science of geology is built.

The methods of field geology include treatments of all phases of the science, and the geologist must be versed in the principles of mineralogy, petrology, stratigraphy, structural geology, economic geology, physiography, paleontology, and surveying. The experienced field man, regardless of any particular specialization, has at least a basic training in the several geological branches, as all phases have a certain bearing in use and applicability in the field.

Field work, as practiced at the present time, falls into two general classifications: (1) examinations made chiefly to ascertain the commercial value and/or potential possibilities of a given area; (2) studies undertaken to describe and delineate rock and mineral occurrences in general. These classifications exist largely because analyses of many mineralized areas are made for private enterprise and the information obtained often is not for public perusal. Conversely, when the results of a field study are for public use, or when the research is chiefly one of a theoretical, academic consideration, definite economic interpretations rarely are presented.

There is no wish to suggest that techniques for the two types of field work are at variance, but instead that the objective desired simply may lead to specialization in certain phases of geology and related sciences, or to one mode of attack of the particular problem. Each class of field study has contributed extensively to the develop-

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