Industrial Revolution in Mexico

Industrial Revolution in Mexico

Industrial Revolution in Mexico

Industrial Revolution in Mexico

Excerpt

The word revolution is a familiar one in Mexico. Ever since the revolt against Porfirio Díaz broke out at the end of 1910, Mexico has been undergoing a continuous revolution which is always referred to as "the Revolution," and always written with a capital R. The first ten years of the Revolution were years of civil warfare, in which little was accomplished in a positive way. During this period, however, a legal foundation was established for land reform and other measures designed to promote the welfare of the laboring class.

For about twenty years after the civil strife came to an end, agrarian reform and agrarian policy occupied the center of the stage in Mexico. The policy was not one of steady advance. Laws were changed from time to time, and enforcement was subjected to even greater fluctuations. Nevertheless, the main economic and social problem with which the government concerned itself, and the principal basis for economic and social improvement in Mexico, was that of getting land into the hands of the peasants. For two decades Mexico was bent upon carrying out an agrarian revolution.

But since 1940 the center of attention has shifted sharply from agriculture to industry. In a few years' time Mexico has made great headway in establishing a base for a full-scale industrial development, already an impressive achievement though the process is just in the beginning stages. The Mexican government has thrown its weight into the industrialization effort, it has acted in many ways to encourage and to support industrial expansion, and it has made industrialism the keynote of Mexico's economic and social future. Mexico, it is clear, has begun its industrial revolution. This is the new revolution in Mexico,--revolution indeed, but in a new sense of the term.

To analyze and evaluate this revolution in the Mexican economy is the aim of this work. Industrialism in Mexico represents a sharp break with the past, in social outlook as well as in industrial structure; that is why Part I deals with attitudes and points of view. Here we shall examine the basic attitudes upon which the drive to industrialize rests, and also the perspective from which leaders in business, in government, and in labor circles view the nature and the function of Mexico's industrial growth. In addition, the actual policies of the Mexican government directed toward encouraging and advancing industrial development are dealt with in detail in this part of the volume.

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