Great Britain: Geographical Essays

Great Britain: Geographical Essays

Great Britain: Geographical Essays

Great Britain: Geographical Essays

Excerpt

Great Britain displays an astonishing variety of scene: mountains and moorlands above 3,000 ft, fenlands below sea-level; isolated crofts and hamlets still inaccessible to the motor-car, great cities choked with traffic; farms and factories; all are to be found within one small island. It is therefore a reflexion of reality that the essays collected here are very different in their themes; to impose uniformity would be to distort. Each author has selected a theme or themes to bring out the essential character of his area as he sees it; a formal analysis of regional frontiers and sub-divisions has been deliberately avoided as, on the ground, they rarely exist. The areas treated in each essay have been chosen in part for convenience; some areas overlap, some have gaps between. Many have a clear geographical entity, but no claim is made that each is a geographical region, still less that the areas selected for study here are in any sense the geographical regions of Great Britain. To stress this fact no map of Britain showing the areas is printed.

This collection of essays is not a new edition of Great Britain: Essays in Regional Geography, ed. A. G. Ogilvie, Cambridge, 1928. That collection stands enduring, a testimony to the Britain and to the geographers of its period. Readers will find much of value in it.

The Land of Britain: The Report of the Land Utilization Survey of Britain, ed. L. Dudley Stamp, London, 1936-46, is also a most useful work of reference. It is cited here to avoid repetition in chapter bibliographies of many county reports.

It is assumed that readers will use the general maps of Great Britain in one of the larger atlases, and where necessary the local sheets of the ¼-in. Geological and Ordnance Survey maps.Bartholomew's Road Atlas of Great Britainwith layer coloured maps on a scale of 5 miles to 1 inch is a useful collection, and the series of 10 miles to 1 inch published by the Ordnance Survey gives much valuable information. The National Atlas of Great Britain containing a splendid series of maps on a scale of one in two million is to be published shortly.

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