The Curse of the Misbegotten: A Tale of the House of O'Neill

The Curse of the Misbegotten: A Tale of the House of O'Neill

The Curse of the Misbegotten: A Tale of the House of O'Neill

The Curse of the Misbegotten: A Tale of the House of O'Neill

Excerpt

The first time I saw Eugene O'Neill was in the fall of 1946. It was in the offices of the Theatre Guild, a great stone mansion on Fifty-third Street near Fifth Avenue. O'Neill, who had been away from New York for more than ten years, had just returned to attend rehearsals of his latest play, The Iceman Cometh. It was the first play he had allowed to go into production since Ah, Wilderness! and Days Without End in 1933 and 1934.

I had come to the Guild offices to get material for an article on O'Neill for Picture News, a New York Sunday newspaper supplement. When I arrived rehearsals were already in progress in a large, high-ceilinged ballroom on the second floor. I paused at the top of the winding marble staircase and noticed Lawrence Langner, the head of the Theatre Guild, and his wife, Armina Marshall, talking with Joe Heidt, the Guild's press agent. I also saw Theresa Helburn, a Guild executive; Carlotta Monterey O'Neill, the dramatist's third wife; and a number of my colleagues of the press. All around the place there was much talking and hurrying and scurrying.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.