American Labor Dynamics in the Light of Post-War Developments: An Inquiry by Thirty-Two Labor Men, Teachers, Editors, and Technicians

American Labor Dynamics in the Light of Post-War Developments: An Inquiry by Thirty-Two Labor Men, Teachers, Editors, and Technicians

American Labor Dynamics in the Light of Post-War Developments: An Inquiry by Thirty-Two Labor Men, Teachers, Editors, and Technicians

American Labor Dynamics in the Light of Post-War Developments: An Inquiry by Thirty-Two Labor Men, Teachers, Editors, and Technicians

Excerpt

American Labor Dynamics is the result of a group study of the American labor scene in the momentous decade since the United States joined with the European powers in the World War. Over thirty university men, teachers of economics, politics and labor problems, practical labor leaders, and labor publicists and educators took a direct part in the effort. An even larger number of people of the same groups coöperated with the editor of the volume and the contributing editors in the preparation and examination of the manuscripts. Their criticisms of views and attitudes were given careful consideration and incorporated in the respective discussions, whenever that proved reconcilable with the views of the writers in question. Several hundred union executives, editors, and students of labor have made their contributions to a number of symposia and "censuses of opinion" which were conducted by the editors. A considerable number of college students were reached through discussions kindly arranged for the purpose by their teachers.

The studies which resulted in American Labor Dynamics were guided by the Provisional Officers and Advisory Board of the American Labor Problem Associates (ALPA), a coöperative organization "created to study, analyze and interpret factual developments and the movement of ideas within the ranks of labor and on the fringes of the labor movement." The editorial policy of the ALPA is described in its statutes as "one of inquiry and friendly interest toward all contending progressive forces and groups within the organized labor movement."

The coöperative nature of the enterprise needs perhaps to be explained. The contributing editors did not always sit together to analyze the issues involved and to find adequate solutions for them. The editor was a sort of moving central clearing house who conferred with smaller groups of contributing editors every now and then in a number of cities.

American Labor Dynamics is not one more reference book. There was no effort made to assemble between the covers of one book all the available information about matters of interest and sig-

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