The Countesse of Pembrokes Arcadia: Examined and Discussed by the Late Edward George Harman, C. B. (With a Chapter on Thomas Lodge)

The Countesse of Pembrokes Arcadia: Examined and Discussed by the Late Edward George Harman, C. B. (With a Chapter on Thomas Lodge)

The Countesse of Pembrokes Arcadia: Examined and Discussed by the Late Edward George Harman, C. B. (With a Chapter on Thomas Lodge)

The Countesse of Pembrokes Arcadia: Examined and Discussed by the Late Edward George Harman, C. B. (With a Chapter on Thomas Lodge)

Excerpt

This book forms the fourth volume of a series, of which the first three are Edmund Spenser and the Impersonations of Francis Bacon (Constables, 1914), Gabriel Harvey and Thomas Nashe (1922), and The Impersonality of Shakespeare. As it is the last contribution which I expect to make to the subject of Baconian authorship, I take the opportunity to offer a few prefatory remarks.

In the first place I desire to say that any conclusions as to the authorship of the works which pass under the name of Spenser were arrived at independently and solely from a study of the internal evidence. I afterwards found that similar conclusions had been reached by others, largely, so far as I can gather, through the alleged existence of a cipher running through various works. Mr.Parker Woodward was good enough to send me a work of his, entitled Tudor Problems, published in 1914, in which he sets out these conclusions, which, as I understand him, he has reached, to some extent at any rate, through this method. I am no judge of this cipher, having never studied it; but, though I have read his book with great interest, and find myself in general agreement with his conclusions as to the Baconian authorship of a number of works which pass under other names or initials, I wholly dissent from him, and others who share his opinions, on the subject of Francis Bacon's parentage. The view which he maintains is that there is a cipher story declaring that Bacon was a natural son of Queen Elizabeth and the Earl of Leicester, and that Robert, Earl of Essex, Queen Elizabeth's favourite in her latter years, was born of the same parents.

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