North to Canada: Men and Women against the Vietnam War

North to Canada: Men and Women against the Vietnam War

North to Canada: Men and Women against the Vietnam War

North to Canada: Men and Women against the Vietnam War

Synopsis

While we may never know the exact number of Americans who chose Canada over Vietnam, an estimated half-million men and women went north as a result of their opposition to the war. Despite President Ford's amnesty and President Carter's pardon, some of these exiles never returned. This book, which focuses upon those who remained in Canada, offers a resister's eye view of the most traumatic war in American history. Dickerson blends resister interviews with an account of the historical events that served as watersheds for these young Americans.

Excerpt

Vietnam. For those of my generation, the word hangs in our consciousness like the heavy, velvet backdrops that adorned the stages of our high school auditoriums. Over the years, dramas have come and gone in our lives, parading before the backdrop with pathos, bravado, and occasional good humor, but always the curtain was there, looming in the background, an ominous reminder of something dark and forbidding.

March 29, 1998, marked the twenty-fifth anniversary of the withdrawal of American troops from Vietnam. It hardly seems possible that it has been over thirty years since the Vietnam War was at its zenith. At the time, if you had asked those who fought against the war -- and those who fought in the war -- if the day would ever come when it would cease to matter, you would have been greeted with derisive laughter. The Vietnam War, whether you were for it or against it, is our generation: It is who we are.

The fact that Vietnam had fallen out of the popular vocabulary by the late 1990s, the fact that war resisters and veterans alike have been not only forgotten but ignominiously ignored, is not surprising when you consider that most Americans who are today in their twenties and thirties have no memory of that era, even if it was one of the most traumatic periods in American history. Those who do have clear memories are now in their late forties and fifties, a sizable segment of the population, but hardly one that fits the sell, sell, sell demographics of today's youthoriented news and entertainment media.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.