Warriors and Wildmen: Men, Masculinity, and Gender

Warriors and Wildmen: Men, Masculinity, and Gender

Warriors and Wildmen: Men, Masculinity, and Gender

Warriors and Wildmen: Men, Masculinity, and Gender

Synopsis

Warriors and Wildmen is a book about men and masculinity. Through an exploration of the complex issues of sex differences, the book presents a challenge to the predominant ideas of modern feminism. Contemporary studies of sex and gender have come primarily from the perspective of women's studies. In the 1990s, however, a growing body of work offers a male perspective. This book surveys that collection, and draws from a wide variety of popular and scholarly writers in support of its major points. This book will be of interest to anyone involved in men's studies, gender issues, and feminism.

Excerpt

A lot of people who read this book will agree that books for and about men are decidedly worthwhile, but many others, men and women alike, are yet to be persuaded. The general feeling seems to be that men are as strong and resourceful as the phrase "I'm all right, Jack," suggests, and that they dont need studying. The first part of the equation is okay, but the second part is off base.

It goes without saying that the politics of gender have complicated our lives. Truth be told, I'm not sure it had to be this way at all. When Robert Louis Stevenson observed that "there is so much good in the worst of us, and so much bad in the best of us, that it behooves all of us not to talk about the rest of us," he could easily have been talking about activists on the distaff side of the sexual divide. Critics will argue that statements such as these are proof positive that I am sorely in need of consciousness-raising, but it's only the simple truth that arguments about gender roles and gender relations have made a lot of ordinary people extremely contrary. Relations between men and women have taken a pounding, often for the most pedestrian of reasons. From the tempest of the innocent gesture, like opening a car door, to the teapot of tribal rhetoric, the notion of the "level playing field" popping into mind, talking about the "rest of us" has become a tireless obsession. It is sad that the cult of the victim has become such a critical factor in the politics of gender. The author of this . . .

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