Area Handbook for Burundi

Area Handbook for Burundi

Area Handbook for Burundi

Area Handbook for Burundi

Excerpt

With the advent of Independence in 1962, Burundi shared in the new prestige achieved by African nations as they moved from colonial or guardianship status to complete self government. The full development of the air age makes the new state, formerly isolated by geography, appear much less remote. The capital city of Bujumbura is a focal point of local water, land, and air routes connecting Burundi and her northern neighbors, Rwanda and Uganda, with the Congo (Kinshasa) and the nations in southern central Africa. Increased interest among the world community has brought into focus the need for a brief but comprehensive coverage of information on the new state. This handbook is an attempt to fill this need.

When research was completed early in 1969, source material of recent date was meager in several subject-areas, including population, living conditions, political dynamics, and the operations of the customary and formal courts.

Grateful acknowledgment is due to many persons who gave time and detailed knowledge to provide data and constructive criticism, particularly to John D. Stempel and Lloyd M. Rives, Foreign Service Officers of the Department of State, and to Robert L. Clifford, United Nations Economic Advisor.

The Europeanized versions of Rundi (Kirundi) proper names are not standardized. In Rundi, a Bantu language, prefixes determine the nature of the main word (radical) and whether it is singular or plural. Thus Murundi is a man of the Rundi, and is also the adjectival form, as in Murundi hut; Barundi is men of the Rundi, and is also the adjective, as in Barundi huts. Burundi, the place of the Rundi, is the name of the country.

For the sake of simplification, completely anglicized versions of proper nouns have been used. The word Burundi is used as both singular and plural for a man or several men of Burundi rather than the Rundi words Murundi and Barundi, and is also extended to the adjectival form, as in Burundi hut. The simpler versions of other nouns, such as Tutsi and Hutu (which are both singular and plural) rather than Mututsi (Batutsi) and Muhutu (Bahutu), have been used.

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