Wrath in Burma: The Uncensored Story of General Stilwell and International Maneuvers in the Far East

Wrath in Burma: The Uncensored Story of General Stilwell and International Maneuvers in the Far East

Wrath in Burma: The Uncensored Story of General Stilwell and International Maneuvers in the Far East

Wrath in Burma: The Uncensored Story of General Stilwell and International Maneuvers in the Far East

Excerpt

We are going to Rangoon," said the little man with the wiry graying black hair, "to do what we can to help the Chinese and the British hold that city. We will help all we can to get Lend-Lease supplies to China and someday we may train and equip a Chinese army."

Major General Joseph W. Stilwell didn't seem very optimistic about getting to Rangoon in time. "If Rangoon falls," he continued, "we will have to hold as much of Burma as we can and start building a road from India to connect with the old Burma Road and that, gentlemen, will be one hell of a job."

As Stilwell's staff sat in room 2309 of the old Munitions Building, headquarters for the War Department, on this eighth day of February 1942, members wondered how many American troops The Boss would have. He may have sensed this unspoken question because, smiling dryly, he said: "Ours will not be a very formidable force. We will be composed of about thirty-five staff officers and five enlisted men. The War Department is going to send a lot of old Lee-Enfield rifles over to the Chinese Army and, if the ship gets through, we will get about 400 technicians and instructors to aid in training the Chinese in the use of Lend-Lease equipment and in tactics."

The general said he had asked for an army corps but didn't get very far. There weren't any army corps available. What the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.