Notes on the Heart: Affective Issues in the Writing Classroom

Notes on the Heart: Affective Issues in the Writing Classroom

Notes on the Heart: Affective Issues in the Writing Classroom

Notes on the Heart: Affective Issues in the Writing Classroom

Synopsis

In this book, McLeod follows a group of students through a semester of writing assignments, tracking the students' progress and examining the affective elements relevant to their writing. To facilitate future discussion of these phenomena, McLeod also provides suggested definitions for terms in the affective domain.

Excerpt

A word about the collaboration of Susans that has led to this book. The idea for the book and the eventual first draft came from Susan McLeod. Appropriately enough, the book grew out of an affective experience: a vague feeling of dissatisfaction with the explanatory power of both cognitive and social constructionist theories of the composing process. Let me, the first Susan, hasten to say that I have found both these approaches to researching and teaching composition most helpful, as readers will discover throughout this book; both provide useful ways of conceptualizing issues and of putting theory into practice in the classroom. I have found Linda Flower newest book, The Construction of Negotiated Meaning: A Social Cognitive Theory of Writing (Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1994) to be especially insightful.

But various encounters, familiar to all teachers of composition, told me I needed to know more about matters of the heart. There was Alice, the student who remained satisfied with her first drafts and didn't revise, even though her editing group (and her teacher) told her rather insistently that her work needed revision. Then there was Leontina, the student who usually wrote well but produced a very disjointed paper on a topic she obviously cared deeply about. There was Ira, the student who told me that he had never been good at English, his voice and manner suggesting that it was hopeless to try; he was defeated before he started, putting little effort into the assignments because he knew he would fail. Most frustrating to me were the students (more numerous than I liked to admit) who seemed to care more about grades than about improving their writing. How could I deal--and help students deal in productive ways--with what seemed to be affective rather than social/cognitive issues?

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.