The Re-Creating of the Individual: A Study of Psychological Types and Their Relation to Psychoanalysis

The Re-Creating of the Individual: A Study of Psychological Types and Their Relation to Psychoanalysis

The Re-Creating of the Individual: A Study of Psychological Types and Their Relation to Psychoanalysis

The Re-Creating of the Individual: A Study of Psychological Types and Their Relation to Psychoanalysis

Excerpt

In looking over some old numbers of the Hibbert Journal I came upon an essay of Bergson's which coincided so completely in spirit with my own attitude and, I may say, knowledge of human life, gained, however, through the path of experience and study with individuals themselves instead of through philosophy, that I cannot do better than present an extract from it as a preface to my book.

Philosophers who have speculated on the significance of life and the destiny of man have not sufficiently remarked that Nature has taken pains to give us notice every time this destiny is accomplished; she has set up a sign which apprises us every time our activity is in full expansion; this sign is joy; I do not say pleasure. Pleasure, in point of fact, is no more than an instrument contrived by Nature to obtain from the individual the preservation and the propagation of life; it gives us no information concerning the direction in which life is flung forward. True joy, on the contrary, is always an emphatic sign of the triumph of life. Now, if we follow this new line of facts, we find that wherever joy is, creation has been, and that the richer the creation the deeper the joy. . . .

Consider exceptional joys like those of the great artist who has produced a masterpiece, of the scientific man who has made a discovery of invention. We sometimes say they have worked for glory and derive their greatest satisfaction from the applause of mankind. Profound mistake! We care for praise in the exact measure in which we feel not sure of having succeeded; it is because we want to be reassured as to our own value and as to the value of what we have done that we seek praise and prize glory. But he who is certain, absolutely certain, that he has brought a living work to the birth, cares no more for praise and feels himself beyond glory, because there is no greater joy than that of feeling oneself a creator. If then, in every province, the triumph of life is expressed by crea-

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