Seven Years in Soviet Russia: With a Retrospect

Seven Years in Soviet Russia: With a Retrospect

Seven Years in Soviet Russia: With a Retrospect

Seven Years in Soviet Russia: With a Retrospect

Excerpt

The chapters of this book are a record of the author's seven years as a journalist in Soviet Russia. They will be found to give a picture of Soviet Russia in a chronological form; they may be thus of value to the future historian of the Soviet Union.

The author believes that the course of the destinies of the Red Empire has hitherto been determined by certain definite laws, and that its future course, down to the final decision as to whether it is to perish or to endure, will continue to be determined by these same laws. These laws have revealed their operation but very gradually, though ever more and more clearly. The close of the year 1929 brought open war against the Russian peasantry, which had hitherto been free. At the same time Stalin proclaimed the end of the "New Economic Policy." These acts were the final demonstration and the open acknowledgment of the laws referred to. The author and his articles fell with these acts like ripe apples from the tree of Soviet knowledge! At the moment when what he had been fearing for so many years became a fact, when, at last, the NEP finally broke down, return to Soviet Russia was forbidden him "because of articles that had been increasingly unfriendly over the past three years."

The conditions under which newspapermen from foreign countries have been working during this time in Moscow give a fairly accurate picture of the general trend of events as a whole; and, on this ground alone, it might seem permissible to enter here upon this aspect of life in Russia.

At the beginning the Soviet authorities looked with favour upon foreign visitors whom they regarded as well disposed. For the misery and destruction which lay about them they did not consider themselves responsible. Their comprehensive programme for the future justified everything in their eyes. Much more noticeably than is the case to-day they were looking ahead . . .

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