The Liberal Arts College Movement

The Liberal Arts College Movement

The Liberal Arts College Movement

The Liberal Arts College Movement

Excerpt

A conference of representatives of two hundred and seventy-eight liberal arts colleges was held at the Stevens Hotel in Chicago on March 18-20, 1930. That conference had been called "to consider the relation of the college of liberal arts to higher education in the United States at the present time, and to set forth collectively the needs of the colleges of liberal arts in order that they may function more adequately; and to discuss and formulate a plan by which an appeal may be made to the American people for the financial resources necessary if the liberal arts colleges are to function efficiently in the interest of the nearly one million students now in college and the increasing number which may reasonably be expected within the next decade or two."

The inspiration of that conference was President Albert Norman Ward of Western Maryland College. He had made a study of enrollment and endowment resources of four hundred colleges and universities and embodied his findings in a pamphlet entitled Making Provision for the College of Liberal Arts--The Small College, which he sent to every college president in the United States. College and university presidents from all sections of the country, representing state universities, privately controlled institutions and separate four-year colleges, both large and small, wrote President Ward their appreciation of the pamphlet, and in many instances strongly urged that something . . .

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