Japanese Sculpture

Japanese Sculpture

Japanese Sculpture

Japanese Sculpture

Excerpt

East and West, separated as they are by geographical distance, differ from each other considerably in their modes and aspects of artistic expression. Since, however, all forms of art are worthy to be treasured as the common property of mankind, the Orient and the Occident should constantly strive for mutual understanding and respect in matters of art-appreciation. And this necessity has never been greater than at the present time, when civilization has so amazingly reduced the distance between East and West that Oriental art is no longer the art of a distant land that it once was to the Westerner, but is that of his immediate neighbour. Yet even now, how few are the Westerners who really understand Eastern art! It may well be that there is no urgent need for such an understanding on the part of the Occidental; but his neglect of efforts to acquire any knowledge of Eastern art would be tantamount to allowing his own artistic or aesthetic sense to lie half asleep when he should awaken it to full activity. If, then, this brochure on Japanese sculpture should serve, however slightly, to awaken the Westerner's interest in this subject and give him fresh and fruitful ideas in the creation of new works of art, the author's efforts will be more than amply rewarded.

It may surprise my readers to learn that there survive in this country a great many works of Japanese sculpture of all periods beginning with the fifth century of the Chris-

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