Fundamentals of Public Speaking

Fundamentals of Public Speaking

Fundamentals of Public Speaking

Fundamentals of Public Speaking

Excerpt

In adding another volume to the shelf of textbooks in public speaking we cannot appear as innovators in the theory or principles of public address. Our indebtedness to the teachings and writings of our predecessors and our contemporaries will be obvious. We believe, however, that in the arrangement of the customary materials, in the exposition and illustration of many of the principles, and in the mode of approach to the student, we have managed to improve somewhat over previous practice. Though we believe that our treatment of principles is sufficiently inclusive and systematic, we have made no pretense of writing a treatise on rhetoric. To the pedagogical aspects of our treatment, therefore, we would first call attention.

In most college courses in public speaking the student is asked to make speeches almost from the outset, before he has had time or opportunity to go far in a textbook. Accordingly, after introducing the student to the nature and the implications of the study which he is undertaking (Chapter 1), we present to him a minimum of sound principle and method for his first speeches (Chapters 2-5). Hence he may begin his systematic speechmaking upon a basis of instruction which will be extended and amplified later but will not have to be unlearned or essentially modified. We believe that we have dealt with first things first, and we have found the procedure effective and useful.

In our plan of presentation, we have followed progressively the needs of the beginning student. This principle accounts for the reappearance in later portions of the book of topics already introduced earlier. Outlining, for example, is handled in Chapters 2, 10, and 20; supporting material in Chapters 2 and 9; delivery in Chapters 3-5, 13-15. This method, we believe, is pedagogically sound, and our execution of it not unprofitably repetitious.

The handling of outlining, for example, we find convenient to both teacher and student. The organization of ideas presents a . . .

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