New Light on Liszt and His Music: Essays in Honor of Alan Walker's 65th Birthday

New Light on Liszt and His Music: Essays in Honor of Alan Walker's 65th Birthday

New Light on Liszt and His Music: Essays in Honor of Alan Walker's 65th Birthday

New Light on Liszt and His Music: Essays in Honor of Alan Walker's 65th Birthday

Excerpt

Six years ago James Deaville and I decided to honor fellow Lisztian Alan Walker with a volume of essays--a Festschrift, to use the accepted scholarly lingo--written by friends and colleagues who shared his interests in the life, music, and influence of one of nineteenth-century Europe's most remarkable artists. Letters were mailed to some two dozen eminent performers and scholars, and after a bit of negotiating the fourteen authors whose work is represented below agreed to take part in our venture.

The essays that follow are divided into three principal categories: those dealing with Liszt's life and relationships; those dealing with documentary and reception studies; and those detailing with Liszt's compositions and musical influence.

Thanks in large part to Alan's work, new information about Liszt's life continues to be discovered. No Liszt scholar is more highly esteemed thanDezső Legány, one of Hungary's most distinguished musicologists and the author of two books on Liszt's relationship with his homeland between 1869 and 1886. Legány's essay below also deals with Liszt and Hungary, but from 1848-1867. The author of a celebrated translation of Liszt's early travel writings, Charles Suttoni has contributed an article about Liszt's complex relationship with Richard Wagner's music-drama Tannhäuser. Long-time Weimar resident Hans Rudolf Jung, who moved to Kassel after German Reunification, presents us with a study of Liszt and the Meyendorff family and discusses, among other things, portraits of the Master preserved in one of Clemens von Meyendorff's sketchbooks. Finally, Los Angeles-area pianist and teacher Geraldine Keeling writes about Liszt's relationship with the Canadian piano-building firm of Mason & Risch.

Investigations of Liszt documents have proliferated in recent years, but few can claim the authority of what Anne Troisier de Diaz has given us: a "first edition" of and commentary on Blandine Liszt's letters to her father as well as to Ernest and Démonthène Ollivier, to the Princess Carolyne (von) Sayn-Wittgenstein, and several other correspondents. Pauline Pocknell teaches French at McMaster University and has helped Alan with a number of his own researches. Her examination and evaluation of clandestine Liszt portraits includes . . .

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