Risky Sexual Behaviors among African-Americans

Risky Sexual Behaviors among African-Americans

Risky Sexual Behaviors among African-Americans

Risky Sexual Behaviors among African-Americans

Synopsis

The major purpose of this book is to examine the interrelationships among knowledge about the transmission of HIV/AIDS, condom use, drug use, history of sexually transmitted diseases, and other relevant factors that affect African-American males and females who engage in risky sexual behaviors. Another aim is to describe how these factors are differentially related to gender and the perceived susceptibility of being exposed to the AIDS virus and testing positive for AIDS. Data has been gathered from a young adult sample of African-American males and females. Information is presented in a readily accessible manner so the reader can understand the variability of risky sexual behaviors. Johnson offers factual information that can be used to develop HIV/AIDS prevention programs specifically tailored for the African-American community.

Excerpt

Since the turn of the century, the overall health of all Americans has improved substantially. Although advances in medical and scientific technology have improved the health status of the American people, there is a growing concern and recognition that African-Americans have not benefited equitably from the fruits of science. Most African- Americans suffer poorer health than the non-minority populations. They die in larger numbers and suffer more illnesses and incidence of disease than the nation as a whole. Whereas these facts are not "new news," it is apparent that most of the public and the scientific community are not fully aware of the full impact of these problems. For example, African-Americans represent an increasing proportion of the population in the United States. The 1980 Bureau of the Census report indicates that one out of five persons in the United States is a member of a minority group, and that African-Americans are the single largest minority group, constituting 11.5 percent of the country's total population. The number of African-Americans in 1980 was 26.5 million, an increase of approximately 17 percent over the 1970 census figures.

The health status of African-Americans and other ethnic minorities became a national priority with the enactment of Medicare and Medicaid in the 1960s. Unfortunately, the nation did not recognize its importance again until 1984, when Secretary of Health, Margaret H. Heckler, commissioned the Report of the Secretary's Task Force on African-American and Minority Health to investigate and document the health status of minority populations and recommend strategies to ameliorate any problems that were revealed. The Task Force spent a year uncovering a wealth of data and compiling statistics on the health status and access to health care of African-Americans and other ethnic minority groups (Asian American/Pacific Islanders . . .

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