International Security and Arms Control

International Security and Arms Control

International Security and Arms Control

International Security and Arms Control

Synopsis

International Security and Arms Control examines the impact of arms control and nuclear strategy issues on the relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union. Based on a conference held at Emory University, this book's contributors include former Presidents Ford and Carter, as well as Henry Kissinger, Anatoly Dobrynin, and other current or former important American and foreign government officials and academic experts. They explore the interaction between regional conflicts and superpower policies, how new technologies affect the status quo, and the past record and future prospects for negotiations. Including an examination of U. S. allies and non-nuclear nations, this important and timely new work will appeal to the specialist or layman interested in this critical issue.

Excerpt

President Carter: I'd like to say how delighted we are, at the Carter Center of Emory University in Atlanta, to have such a distinguished group to consider perhaps one of the most important issues that affect our own nation and other countries of the world. When President Ford and I were serving in the Oval Office we both had to be eager students, learning from every possible source, as best we could, the relationship between our country and the Soviet Union, and, of course, arms control is an integral part of that relationship. in the minds of many people--not excluding presidents themselves--it is a kind of a measuring rod of the current, ongoing relationships that irrevocably tie arms control to other issues, for instance, regional conflict. They certainly are closely related.

We have spent the last three days with distinguished panelists from our country and the Soviet Union, China, Japan, Great Britain, France, East Germany, West Germany, and several other nations on Earth, trying to assess the basic ties between our countries and how relationships between the Soviet Union and the United States affect other people on Earth. We've tried to inventory those things that our two countries have in common, and how we might build on those common interests to have a better and more peaceful life for all people. 'We've assessed some of the differences that divide our two nations and how some of those differences might be assuaged or minimized or even eliminated with better understanding, cultural exchange, diplomatic procedures, and even negotiations and summit conferences. and we've assessed also some of the differences that exist between our two nations that are permanent in nature just because we have a different doctrine and different forms of government, different geographical locations on Earth, different ties to our allies, and so forth, and also how those differences might be endured without departing from peaceful relations. We will analyze, in these next two days, how our own actions affect our allies and those nations closest to us and other countries around the world; how regional . . .

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