Japan Speaks on the Sino-Japanese Crisis

Japan Speaks on the Sino-Japanese Crisis

Japan Speaks on the Sino-Japanese Crisis

Japan Speaks on the Sino-Japanese Crisis

Excerpt

By His Excellency TSUYOSHI INUKAI Prime Minister of Japan

FEW can be more genuinely sympathetic toward the Chinese Nationalists and their aspirations than I have been for more than thirty years. When Sun Yatsen and his associates were exiles among us, hounded by Chinese emissaries and threatened with deportation by our government, I shielded them. I had once myself been driven out of Tokyo by a reactionary Cabinet when I was in the van of the constitutional movement, and I at once took a friendly interest in these Chinese who sought my help. For a time Sun Yatsen lived with me. My house was a secret meeting place for the revolutionists. Often they shared my food and clothes and even my meager income. None could have been more jubilant than I was, when the new republic sounded the knell of the Manchu dynasty.

Throughout all the political vicissitudes which followed the birth of the Chinese Republic, Sun Yatsen did not forget me and continued to seek my counsel. When, in 1923, he invited a Soviet emissary to Canton I cautioned him, feeling that he was making a grave mistake in enlisting "Red" assistance. He did not heed me. The consequence is the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.