The Indomitable John Scott: Citizen of Long Island, 1632-1704

The Indomitable John Scott: Citizen of Long Island, 1632-1704

The Indomitable John Scott: Citizen of Long Island, 1632-1704

The Indomitable John Scott: Citizen of Long Island, 1632-1704

Excerpt

To those versed in England's colonial and domestic history during the second half of the seventeenth century John Scott, a minor figure in that colorful time, is remembered as a notorious but picturesque and piquant rascal. Loved by many in America, despised by a few in England, Scott's evil repute has rested largely on depositions which Samuel Pepys obtained but never used to blacken John, a leading and most damaging witness in the parliamentary investigation of that admiralty secretary. Wilbur Cortez Abbott, among others, in his writings of twenty-five to forty years ago on Scott, basing his work largely on the Pepysian papers, is chiefly responsible for giving this seventeenth century character such a disreputable name among students of history.

Now after a careful examination of these same documents Lilian Mowrer has found that the depositions against Scott were made by malevolently inventive witnesses whose evidence would have had little chance of acceptance even in the notorious English Restoration courts. Becoming deeply interested in John Scott she followed him back and forth across Long Island Sound, the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the North Sea, and into the Caribbean. With the help of hundreds of papers and documents she has reconstructed his life from birth in 1632 to his death in 1704.

This gifted, artful man with his widespread interests and far-flung activities -- Long Island landowner, West Indies buc-

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