The Church in Anglo-Saxon England

The Church in Anglo-Saxon England

The Church in Anglo-Saxon England

The Church in Anglo-Saxon England

Excerpt

It is now more than sixty years since William Hunt wrote his History of the English Church from its Foundation to the Norman Conquest, which he claimed as the first attempt at such a history undertaken with any degree of fullness. Meanwhile, many valuable contributions to the subject have appeared in the shape of specialised articles, and Miss Margaret Deanesly The Pre-Conquest Church in England has recently been published. It is the aim of the present work to present a general and fairly comprehensive account of the development of the Church, and its derivative culture, in England from the earliest times until the closing years of the eleventh century. Inevitably, the earlier chapters must deal with Celtic religion, which touched the Anglo-Saxon very closely at many points. At the other end, it was thought preferable to continue the story beyond 1066, as the real close of Anglo-Saxon religious history comes well on in the reign of the Conqueror. The subjects of Anglo-Saxon clerical celibacy, and the history and development of the parochial system, for example, cannot be adequately studied without reference to developments beyond the Conquest.

The aim of the notes has, in general, been threefold: to give references for important or controversial points, to serve as a running guide to further reading, and to include comments which might seem out of place in the text. In the general bibliography I have tried to indicate the broad nature of the material, both primary and secondary, upon which the book is based.

The present nature and circumstances of my life preclude much contact with persons of intellect and scholarship, and it is upon the written word that I have relied for almost the whole of my information. I must in particular thank Sir Frank Stenton for his book Anglo-Saxon England, and Miss Dorothy Whitelock, without whose monumental edition of English Historical Documents, c. 500-1042 my own contribution could scarcely have been made. No new material will be found in this present work, the aim being to utilise as much as possible of the published studies by scholars in various fields. Older books have not been overlooked, particularly W. Bright Chapters of Early English Church History, which is a classic, and J. Lingard History and Antiquities of the Anglo-Saxon Church.

The collection of books on which I have chiefly drawn is that contained in Dr William's Library, Gordon Square, London, whose . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.