The South Looks at Its Past

The South Looks at Its Past

The South Looks at Its Past

The South Looks at Its Past

Excerpt

This is not a history of the South. It is an interpretative study of those phases of the South's past that seem most pertinent to a fresh orientation in this age of dilemmas. An outgrowth of the authors' interest in the new regionalism, it is based upon the assumption that indigenous to each region are certain historic and traditional culture patterns, certain physical and social capacities and limitations, all of which must be taken into account in any rational scheme for a better order of life. In other words, to arrest the drive toward dead levels of uniformity, to promote in each section and locality the development of its own best culture traits as well as physical capacities, and thus perhaps to restore something of the interesting variety that once gave richness and color to the American scene: this is the essence of the new regionalism.

The point has been felt with particular force in the South. For despite its wide sub-regional divergencies, the South does have a unity and distinctiveness more marked than any other section. The former slavehold-

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