An Introduction to the Philosophy of Education

An Introduction to the Philosophy of Education

An Introduction to the Philosophy of Education

An Introduction to the Philosophy of Education

Excerpt

Many of the treatises dealing with the philosophy of education consist of an exposition of the particular philosophy of the individual making the contribution. While this sort of treatment may have the merit of giving to the student the arguments in favor of an individualized point of view, its limitations are obvious.

A different type of treatment requires that the student become familiar with many points of view, with many philosophies of education, that he assume a critical attitude toward each of them, and that he reach certain conclusions with respect to the validity of each of the many theories brought to his attention.

Contemporary educational philosophies get their meaning when viewed in the perspective of the history of philosophy. One may question whether the student has any right to claim that he has developed a philosophy of education except as he has reached his conclusions out of a rich experience in the study of current philosophies of education and of the history of philosophy.

A philosophy of education is not something which stands apart in the experience of the individual. If it is significant at all, it must give meaning to methods of teaching and of learning; it must make its contribution to the understanding and development of character; it must furnish criteria for the judgment of social progress; and it must throw light upon the current scene, whether national or international. The author of this text has met these requirements out of his unusual scholarship in the fields of philosophy, sociology, and government. He . . .

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