Toward Understanding Japan: Constructive Proposals for Removing the Menace of War

Toward Understanding Japan: Constructive Proposals for Removing the Menace of War

Toward Understanding Japan: Constructive Proposals for Removing the Menace of War

Toward Understanding Japan: Constructive Proposals for Removing the Menace of War

Excerpt

On December 29, 1934, Japan denounced the Washington Treaty on naval limitation. To be sure, the treaty will remain in force for two years longer, but that denunciation is a symbol. It means that Japan has thrown down the gauntlet in a fight for naval parity. What has driven Japan to take this drastic step? Has she been goaded to it by the maltreatment of the Western powers? Has her conduct toward China been unjustly condemned? Has America's attitude toward Japan on immigration and Manchuria, or America's naval policy provoked a retaliatory temper in Japan? Has either the United States or Japan or any other of the Great Powers made the Pact of Paris in reality the pivot of its foreign policy? American policy toward Japan hinges on the answers to these questions.

The London "conversations" among the American, British and Japanese representatives were intended to clear the way for the scheduled 1935 Conference on Naval Limitation; but they proved futile and were broken off just before Japan denounced the Washington Treaty. At this writing (January 2,1935 . . .

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