Six Keys to the Soviet System

Six Keys to the Soviet System

Six Keys to the Soviet System

Six Keys to the Soviet System

Excerpt

A perennial subject for discussion among those who take their world affairs seriously is the confusion that seems to exist with reference to the nature and aims of the Soviet regime and the reasons therefor. It is probably more because of long- continued Soviet intransigence than because of Western analyses that in recent years there has arisen a widespread realization that that regime is menacing. Opinions, however, still vary widely as to just how sinister, in what ways, and the specific limits of what is in it that should be feared and condemned. Although there is no doubt but that the level of analysis, penetration, and understanding of our press rises appreciably from year to year, its varied reactions to an apparent lessening of Soviet intransigence indicate that the "nature of the beast" is still far from understood.

A Pulitzer prize-winning reporter once told me that the principal reason for confusion in many fields of human activity is that most people have short memories and, for one reason or another, do not check what they think, say, or often even write, against the record. For one thing, records are often not readily available; thus the publishers of the present volume have done a real service in making available in one place material which, in so far as it has appeared before, has been scattered through a diversity of publications.

Bertram Wolfe needs no introduction to those who are familiar with his Three Who Made a Revolution, that outstanding historical biography of Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin which is also a scholarly and fascinating account of the development of the Bolshevik Party. He is not a special pleader . . .

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