The Peacemakers of 1864

The Peacemakers of 1864

The Peacemakers of 1864

The Peacemakers of 1864

Excerpt

After all, the Civil War was a war. It is proper, therefore, to memorialize its commanders,--Beauregard and McClellan, Longstreet and Meade, Jackson and Hooker, Lee and Grant. Military men should be connected with military affairs. It is proper, also, to litter important battlefields with monuments. Gettysburg and Chattanooga were the scenes of great conflicts. And if the definition of warfare be enlarged, some attention can justly be bestowed upon its incidental aspects, railroads, hospitalization, prisons, and finance. Thus the circle of military history can eventually be circumscribed. But the history of the Civil War would still be incomplete unless attention was directed to a conflict not waged upon the battlefields where the armies met but behind the lines where a host of various opinions were "as for a battle ranged" and where the struggle between them, though not fought with arms, was just as merciless and just as bitter. The task of reconciling these differences of opinion, of creating and sustaining a united desire for war--in short, the problem of public morale--was a vital factor in the Civil War. It may even be appraised the . . .

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