Employes' Representation in Steel Works: A Study of the Industrial Representation Plan of the Minnequa Steel Works of the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company

Employes' Representation in Steel Works: A Study of the Industrial Representation Plan of the Minnequa Steel Works of the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company

Employes' Representation in Steel Works: A Study of the Industrial Representation Plan of the Minnequa Steel Works of the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company

Employes' Representation in Steel Works: A Study of the Industrial Representation Plan of the Minnequa Steel Works of the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company

Excerpt

How a company, which operates more than twenty bituminous coal mines, a large steel works, and a railroad in Colorado, undertook to organize its relations with its workers by instituting a plan of "employes' representation" is the subject of two studies, one on coal mines and one on steel works, which are simultaneously published.

It was during the prolonged strike of coal miners in Colorado in 1913 that W. L. Mackenzie King, former Minister of Labor, and subsequently Premier, of Canada, was asked by John D. Rockefeller, Jr., who was the largest stockholder in the largest company involved in the strike, the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company, to suggest a plan which would prevent the recurrence of such a catastrophe. Both men believed that the lack of personal relationships between directing management and employes, which is characteristic of modern industrial organization, was the true point of origin of the bitter conflict of the coal strike in Colorado. To restore the personal relationships that existed in the days of small-scale crafts in a company which employs 5,000 men in its mines and 7,000 in its steel works in Colorado alone, and operates lime quarries and iron mines in another state and a railway carrying both freight and passengers, was obviously impossible. The . . .

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