The Growth of Canadian Policies in External Affairs

The Growth of Canadian Policies in External Affairs

The Growth of Canadian Policies in External Affairs

The Growth of Canadian Policies in External Affairs

Excerpt

The appearance in the era of two World Wars of the Commonwealth of Nations as the heir to what was once the British Empire has not been given in the United States the attention it merits as a field for study. It was in response to this need that a Commonwealth-Studies Center was created at Duke University in 1955 with financial assistance from the Carnegie Corporation. The Center is devoted to the encouragement of research in Commonwealth affairs by members of the Duke University faculty and graduate students, and to the encouragement of similar research in economics, history, and political science by scholars and graduate students from various Commonwealth countries.

The purposes of the Center are implemented in a number of ways. Among these is the annual program known as the Commonwealth Summer Seminar and Research Group, which in each of the summers of 1956, 1957, 1958, and 1959 brought to the University for a period of two months groups of scholars already known for their interest and competence in one or another aspect of Commonwealth affairs. During the summer these scholars in residence pursued their own research in their chosen fields. They came together daily around the coffee table for informal discussion of their research projects or of more general Commonwealth topics. In addition, the group met formally at intervals as a seminar for critical analysis of papers prepared by distinguished visiting Canadian and American lecturers.

In the summer of 1959 the visiting lecturers presented papers on the growth of Canadian policies and procedures in external affairs. In these more formal sessions, as well as in the daily informal meetings, the visiting scholars were joined by interested members of the Duke University faculty.

The Summer Seminar and Research Group program has thus sought to further a number of useful purposes. It has provided a means whereby a limited number of scholars who are university teachers with Commonwealth interests may pursue their research throughout a summer unimpeded by the demands of classroom instruction. It has given them an opportunity for informal association with others of similar interests for . . .

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