The Bureaucrat

The Bureaucrat

The Bureaucrat

The Bureaucrat

Excerpt

What the American nation did to win this war will be so impressive when future histories are written that only the students of political science and public administration will be concerned with the irksome blunderings which are so much in our minds in 1944. Our Allies, and even Americans returned from England, could easily find fault with the ponderous gait with which we got our war program under way, but what they overlooked was that America fought this war, as it did the last, largely on principle. No bombs to speak of fell on the American Continent; the enemy, until Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, had been pretty cautious about military action against the United States; and it looked as though even Herr Hitler was counting upon American isolationists to keep the weight of our might from rescuing England in her hour of need. But the combination of our affection for our old Allies, the British and French, the horror with which we viewed Hitler's brutal disregard for either his promises or for the rest of European humanity, and the clarity with which the world significance of Hitlerism gradually dawned upon the American people, left us no alternative but to grab the old musket out of the closet and join our ideological brethren. This was a creditable way to go to war, not as easy as fighting when people drop bombs on your houses and kill your children, but perhaps the more noteworthy because of the nobility of fighting for a cause alone, without the element of retribution. Of course, we were at war against Hitler before the Japanese provided the provocation which the German end of the Axis had been so careful not to offer. And then we had retribution as well as principle on . . .

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