American Literature: An Interpretative Survey

American Literature: An Interpretative Survey

American Literature: An Interpretative Survey

American Literature: An Interpretative Survey

Excerpt

Interest in American literature since the World War has grown very markedly. With the shift of the world's financial capital from London to New York there has come also an intensifying of interest in our national culture, an interest elicited in part by an unusually rich period of creation in every field of endeavor. Foreign as well as native critics speak of "America's Coming of Age." It is a happy phrase. It implies that culturally we have "arrived." The ailments of childhood we have left behind us, along with our elder brother's cast-off clothes. We are growing a beard and are ready to take upon ourselves all the duties and prerogatives of manhood. The prospect allures, but the retrospect is sweet also.

If the War removed our feeling of "splendid isolation," obviously one of its sequels is a revaluation of our literature. In this, perhaps the first connected account of our literature to be written since the newer stock-taking, an endeavor has been made to recognize some of the changes. Accordingly, an author like Melville receives more attention than in the older histories, and one like Holmes, less. A discussion of recent and contemporary literature is included. Throughout the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.