The Susquehanna

The Susquehanna

The Susquehanna

The Susquehanna

Excerpt

History is the memory of time,
the life of the dead,
and the happiness of the living.

--CAPTAIN JOHN SMITH

In the hot summer of 1608 a small short-masted open barge "of neare three tuns burthen," flat-bottomed and cabinless, bobbed on the choppy upper reaches of a long bay which neighboring Indians called "Chesapeake" meaning "Great Water." Their square sail, riddled by the sudden squalls that plague these wide shallows, was a many-colored motley created by patches torn from the shirts of her crew. A few of the thirteen men aboard tugged at the oars to quicken progress as she slid awkwardly toward an open space where water entered the dune-lined coast.

Nine of the thirteen had been crowded together on this little vessel nearly every day of more than two months. On June second under command of Captain John Smith the expedition had embarked, seven "Gentlemen" and seven soldiers from the London Company's settlement, Jamestown, on the northward voyage. For seven weeks they had explored the inlets of the river-laced countryside bordering the bay. On July twenty-first they had inter-

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