Two Lives: The Story of Wesley Clair Mitchell and Myself

Two Lives: The Story of Wesley Clair Mitchell and Myself

Two Lives: The Story of Wesley Clair Mitchell and Myself

Two Lives: The Story of Wesley Clair Mitchell and Myself

Excerpt

". . . my mother's affectionate wisdom and my father's vigorous initiative verging on rashness in business affairs ."

THE CIVIL WAR was over. For some months a young Army surgeon, Dr. John Wesley Mitchell, had been in bed in a veteran's hospital with a badly injured hip. At last he was allowed up on crutches. He was an impatient young man of twenty-nine, big-framed and nearly six feet tall, with a trimmed red goatee, keen, steel-blue eyes and a beak of a nose. His impatience was centered on his wish to be off to Chicago to meet the "young lady" he had corresponded with during his three years of service in the Union Army. He was in love with Lucy Medora McClellan, though he had never met her. He had first seen a picture of her as a fifteen-year-old girl with a crown of braided hair and a long curl hanging over her shoulder. Medora's older sister, Louise, had brought this picture with her when she visited her husband, Captain Parrington, in the army camp where Dr. Mitchell was also stationed. The young doctor had asked if he might correspond with Medora. Many letters passed between them. And she had sent him her picture. He did not want to meet her first on crutches. Neither did he want to wait. "He threw away his crutches and, still using a cane, rushed to Chicago."

In Chicago, Lucy Medora McClellan waited for his coming with an . . .

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