An Examination of Ezra Pound: A Collection of Essays

An Examination of Ezra Pound: A Collection of Essays

An Examination of Ezra Pound: A Collection of Essays

An Examination of Ezra Pound: A Collection of Essays

Excerpt

Ezra Pound was born in Idaho in the wilds of the far Mid- West in 1885, and was already the "country boy" when he went to college at Pennsylvania and Hamilton. After gaining his Master's degree in Romance languages, his career as a University lecturer was short and stormy, for he was thrown out of Wabash College, Crawfordsville, "for being too much the Latin Quarter type". In January 1908 he made his way on a cattle ship to Gibraltar, walked to Venice, and had his first book of poems published there under the title A Lume Spento. Arriving in London early in 1909, he was immediately noticeable for his red beard, his huge mop of blonde hair, and his unorthodox opinions on literature. Three books of his poems appeared in London that year. In 1910 another book of poems, and his first prose book, The Spirit of Romance, an authoritative, or perhaps one should say, authoritarian, comparative survey of literature in the Romance languages from the Silver Latin poets to Lope de Vega, appeared. By this time he was a member of the circle of the philosopher-poet T. E. Hulme. His literary association with Hulme, F. S. Flint and others of that circle led first to his interest in the concision of Japanese verse forms like the tanka and the hokku, and later to the Imagist Movement, of which he himself was the leading light (with H.D. and Richard Aldington as close associates). The anthology Des Imagistes is the most obvious landmark of the movement. It was compiled (anonymously) by Pound and appeared in 1914. By this time, however, he was much absorbed by other wider problems, notably painting and sculpture. His work with Percy Wyndham Lewis, and his friendship with Henri Gaudier Brzeska, led to a new and more inclusive movement, the Vorticist Movement. If the taste of Roger Fry had seemed outrageous when he had championed the Post-Impressionists in 1910, these young men with their paper, Blast, and their twofold attack on Fry and the futurist Marinetti as Impressionist "reactionaries", must have seemed ludicrous. Time . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.