A Ceramic Study of Virginia Archeology

A Ceramic Study of Virginia Archeology

A Ceramic Study of Virginia Archeology

A Ceramic Study of Virginia Archeology

Excerpt

While I was a member of the faculty of the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va., funds were made available in the form of a research grant from the Richmond Area University Center, Inc., for survey and excavation of archeological sites within Virginia during the summer months of 1950. Not only would this work have been impossible without the financial assistance of this research foundation, but it was encouraging to discover that it was the first time funds had been granted for research in local archeology. It is hoped the results of the research are satisfying to the Richmond Area University Center, Inc., and that the report stands as an expression of my deepest appreciation for their cooperation, interest, and aid.

To single out individuals and express in different words appreciation for their efforts is always difficult in the limited space of a preface, but of all the magnificent cooperation throughout the project, none is surpassed by that offered by C. G. Holland, then editor of the Quarterly Bulletin of the Archeological Society of Virginia, who was living in Charlottesville at the time I was teaching anthropology at the University of Virginia. Through long conversations with Dr. Holland concerning the problems of archeology in which I demonstrated to him the technique that we had applied successfully in Perú and in the Amazon, he gradually conveyed to me the crying need for similar work in Virginia archeology. Admittedly, the area was far afield from my Latin American specialty, but the problems appeared interesting and when the means to carry out a limited program were made available by a research grant, the summer months of 1950 were spent in running a survey in order to collect a large number of sherds from as many sites as possible. Since Dr. Holland had a firsthand knowledge of numerous sites, he accompanied my wife Betty J. Meggers and me in some of our fieldwork. Not only did he devote considerable time to the field survey, but he generously offered all of his documented collections for restudy and incorporation in the survey.

Since Dr. Holland also had collections of projectile points from many sites, and we were obtaining a fair amount of this material in our own work, I suggested that he undertake a study of the chipped stone artifacts, independently of my ceramic analysis, to see whether the data would prove culturally significant. With some guidance and help on the methods of typology, he presented an excellent study, which, because of its significance, has been incorporated in this report . . .

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