Nature: Cosmic, Human and Divine

Nature: Cosmic, Human and Divine

Nature: Cosmic, Human and Divine

Nature: Cosmic, Human and Divine

Excerpt

If Francis Bacon could worthily say in the seventeenth century 'I have taken all knowledge to be my province', such a remark by any individual to-day would raise an immediate suspicion as to his sanity. Yet if the title of these Terry Lectures may faintly suggest such temporary loss of balance, a threefold reply is still possible. In the first place, the rapidly increasing specialism in scientific research, and its demands upon the worker's time, will probably sooner or later result in the development of a class of teachers who, having passed through a scientific discipline, will require to devote most of their energy to the exposition of the subject-matter of their particular science as a whole, studying also its bearings on closely related sciences, and human life and thought in general. In the second place, before this development has fully come about, it is essentially a helpful service to the fellowman when individuals like the previous Terry Lecturers, distinguished in some particular field, are willing to offer the fruit of their reflection upon the relation of the fresh knowledge accumulating in their field to the most fundamental problems of life. And even lesser communications may have their value, for it is . . .

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