Emotion and Conduct in Adolescence: For the Commission on Secondary School Curriculum

Emotion and Conduct in Adolescence: For the Commission on Secondary School Curriculum

Emotion and Conduct in Adolescence: For the Commission on Secondary School Curriculum

Emotion and Conduct in Adolescence: For the Commission on Secondary School Curriculum

Excerpt

To grow up to be a fit and happy member of contemporary society is not a simple process. This development is not only complex; with all its satisfactions, it is often difficult as well. The chief duty of the school is to give the help young people need in order to make socially constructive adjustments in the course of their growth--that is, the school is mainly concerned with their social development. Organized society expects it thus to continue, supplement, and, when necessary, even offset the influence of the home and other agencies in the public interest.

In a comparatively spontaneous and complex society such as that of present-day America, community needs are correspondingly diverse, fluctuating, and obscure. But even here and now, in any given community in the United States today, basic values can be singled out that are essential to the public interest. These are fundamental in determining what course education in America must take if it is to foster social development. They derive from the democratic organization of the community.

A democratic society holds the individual in respect. It affords substantial opportunity for personal differences in intellectual and emotional self-realization. At the same time, it . . .

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