The Long House of the Iroquois

The Long House of the Iroquois

The Long House of the Iroquois

The Long House of the Iroquois

Excerpt

THE "People of the Long House" ("Ho-De'-No-Sau- Nee") consisted of five tribal-families of Iroquois-- the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, and Senecas. These "Five Nations"--as English colonists called them before they adopted the French racial term, Iroquois, --dwelt in a veritable "Long House." This was as true of their own habitations, as of the rectangular shape of their territory; for their cabins were built with two doors at the long ends connected by an aisle along which often were four "fires,"--a term indicating that four related families occupied the lodge. This arrangement was symbolical of their League. For their "Long House" at its East Door near Albany,--bordered by the Catskills, Lake Champlain, and the Hudson River valley,--was guarded by the Mohawks; while its West Door at Niagara Falls,--flanked by Lake Erie and Lake Ontario, was guarded by the Senecas. Between the two "doors," the exact half-way point on this 300-mile- long-trail is the attractive village of Skaneateles. This village lies at the foot of a lake of the same name, meaning, according to our oldest tradition, "Beautiful Squaw." Also, in recent times, it is called the "Little Finger" lake, such designation being shown at the northern village-limits where two ornamental lamp-posts bear the modern sign "Eastern Gateway to the Finger Lakes." Only a short distance beyond this gateway lies Fairview Farm of one hundred acres. This farm is a part of Military Lot 27, awarded to Gen. Robert Earll in 1794 for his services in the Revolution. Some years later my great-grandfather, Gen. Ezra . . .

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