Mankind at the Crossroads

Mankind at the Crossroads

Mankind at the Crossroads

Mankind at the Crossroads

Excerpt

In earlier years the writer travelled trails of interest which at the time seemed rather unrelated, passing successively and perforce hurriedly from food chemistry and dietetics to soil chemistry, crop production, agricultural economics, and plant breeding. But, after all, these trails are not disconnected paths leading off from the main highway of science in different directions. They are useful portions of the web of communications available to sociology, since they are all concerned with the development of the individual human animal. And they guided him to the trail of genetics, to the study of heredity and evolution, to the problems of the race in the collective sense, a lane which he has tramped persistently and contentedly because of his faith in the vital importance of the goal to which it ought to lead.

Genetics has enticed a great many explorers during the past two decades. They have labored with fruit-flies and guinea-pigs, with sweet peas and corn, with thousands of animals and plants in fact, and they have made heredity no longer a mystery but an exact science to be ranked close behind physics and chemistry in definiteness of conception. One is inclined to believe, however, that the unique magnetic attraction of genetics lies in the vision of potential good which it holds for mankind rather than a circumscribed interest in the hereditary mechanisms of the lowly species used as laboratory material. If man had been found to be sharply demarcated from the rest of the occupants of the world, so that his heritage of physical form, of physiological function, and of mental attributes came about in a superior manner setting him apart as lord of creation, interest in . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.