The Evolution of American Political Parties: A Sketch of Party Development

The Evolution of American Political Parties: A Sketch of Party Development

The Evolution of American Political Parties: A Sketch of Party Development

The Evolution of American Political Parties: A Sketch of Party Development

Excerpt

Nine out of ten citizens have at some time considered themselves and have been called by their neighbors, Democrats or Republicans. This has led naturally, although erroneously, to the assertion that they are members of the Democratic or Republican party. Except in the case of a comparatively few men, and, of course, fewer women, there has been no real membership in party, in the sense of recognized membership in club or church. A citizen has voted, let us say, for every Democratic candidate for President since 1884, except Parkerin 1904 and Wilson in 1912, and usually he has been "regular" on state and local matters. But he has not been in public office, he has not sat in caucus or in convention, he has not paid dues in a political club, and he has not contributed in money or effort to a political campaign. Once a year or once . . .

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