The Settlement of Canadian-American Disputes: A Critical Study of Methods and Results

The Settlement of Canadian-American Disputes: A Critical Study of Methods and Results

The Settlement of Canadian-American Disputes: A Critical Study of Methods and Results

The Settlement of Canadian-American Disputes: A Critical Study of Methods and Results

Excerpt

In 1932, after preliminary discussions in a group of Americans and Canadians meeting under the genial chairmanship of Dr. J. T. Shotwell, a plan took shape for the impartial, objective study of all the interplay in the activities of our two peoples. The proposed field of work was both long and wide. It stretched far back into the past; its scope embraced all the important points of contact. It was divided roughly among the disciplines of History, Economics, Sociology, Political Science and Law, though everyone concerned knew that the border-lines could not be sharply drawn and that something of all five techniques would probably recur in each division.

Each division was assigned to a group whose members were chosen from Canada and the United States, and the work was sub-divided among these members with due regard to geographical distribution as well as to technical equipment. Much of the task has now reached the publication stage, and a series of volumes is in print or in preparation for the press. For the practical elaboration of the plan, and for its transformation from an idea into a series of concrete studies, we have to thank the Division of Economics and History of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the generosity of the Carnegie Corporation.

Under the heading of Political Science fell studies in (a) the inter- influence of political doctrines and institutions; (b) the establishment of joint organs for the administration of common interests; (c) the administration of justice as between the two nations; and (d) joint legislation in the form of treaties and agreements. The present volume embodies the work done on the third of these subjects. Publications on the others will appear in due course.

Such an essay as this, dealing with the settlement of international disputes, might have been thought to belong exclusively to the field of law. But the processes by which law is formed, the sources of its authority, and the machinery by which it is applied, are all matters which find legitimate place in the science of politics; and the reader who numbers the ordering of the international community among the great tasks of contemporary politics will demand no further explanation. Moreover, though it has been thought necessary to indi-

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