Classical Studies

Classical Studies

Classical Studies

Classical Studies

Excerpt

The title of "Classical Studies" may bear a double meaning; and it has been chosen in order to indicate that both senses apply to the contents of this volume. On the one hand these deal with the classics as a subject of study and an instrument of education. They are not a defence of the classics--for the classics require no defence--but an attempt to set forth what the classics are, and in what their value lies. We all, as has been said, spend half our lives in misunderstanding one another; and of the indifference or actual hostility with which the claim of the classics to be an integral and irreplaceable element in higher education has been met, the main reason is to be found in misconceptions both of what the classics are and of what education means. For such misconceptions, classical scholars themselves have not been without a share of responsibility. If they are at all removed by this volume its purpose will have been achieved.

But abstract doctrine, however sound, requires embodiment and exemplification; and the volume also includes a selection of classical studies in the other sense of the term: studies, that is to say, of certain aspects of the vitality, the unexhausted interest, the bearing on actual life, of a few of the . . .

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