Notes on Language and Style

Notes on Language and Style

Notes on Language and Style

Notes on Language and Style

Excerpt

These notes from Hulme's manuscripts were excluded from the volume published as Speculations mainly for economic reasons, but also, I must confess, because at the time of editing that volume their corporate value did not immediately emerge from an extremely illegible script.

Hulme was always haunted by a suspicion of the futility of logic. This is at the bottom of his interest in Bergson, and equally of his somewhat contradictory enthusiasm for Dr. Moore's objective ethics, and of his distrust of Cartesian standards in general. He despised "words," regarding them as mere counters in a game, "beads on a chain," mere physical things carrying no reality. Against words he opposed the image as a unit and the analogy as an instrument of thought. Poetry, in the broad sense of imaginative literature, becomes the only kind of logic worthy of consideration, and the art of poetry the only science of meaning. Thought, he argued, was . . .

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