The Peterborough Anthology: Being a Selection from the Work of the Poets, Who Have Been Members of the McDowell Colony, Compiled and with an Introduction

The Peterborough Anthology: Being a Selection from the Work of the Poets, Who Have Been Members of the McDowell Colony, Compiled and with an Introduction

The Peterborough Anthology: Being a Selection from the Work of the Poets, Who Have Been Members of the McDowell Colony, Compiled and with an Introduction

The Peterborough Anthology: Being a Selection from the Work of the Poets, Who Have Been Members of the McDowell Colony, Compiled and with an Introduction

Excerpt

There can be no question but what there remains in certain quarters an ignorance of the purpose which the MacDowell Colony at Peterborough, New Hampshire, is designed to fulfill. This lack of knowledge extends even to the type of artist who goes there to work during the summer months. The quality and achievements of these artists, the fact that they are not, except in a few cases, beginners, should be made amply manifest by this Anthology. The names to be found here include some of the finest of our contemporary poets and the work, quite apart from its relation to the MacDowell Colony, is of sufficient importance (in our opinion) and carries enough weight by itself to justify the book. However, the ostensible purpose of The Peterborough Anthology is to illustrate by necessarily limited selection the class of poet who avails himself (or herself) of the quietude and admirable facilities afforded by the Colony to serious writers. The diverse affiliations of the poets should be apparent to all. They touch all schools and movements from the extremely modern free verse of Maxwell Bodenheim to the distinguished conservatism of Hermann Hagedorn. Even nationalistic lines are crossed as the names of Padraic Colum and Jules Bois will prove. The MacDowell Colony is in no sense of the word a group, a cult, or a limited undertaking that may be bounded as a movement. Peterborough stands for one thing only:--a place where any creator may work at his own labors without interruption and with that physical and mental comfort that are best calculated to bring out all his power.

In a volume that is limited in scope, that presents but one aspect of a many-sided undertaking, it is obvious that the view afforded will be one-sided. Here are but the poets who have worked at the MacDowell Colony and left out are the novelists, the essayists, the composers, the painters, and the sculptors. It will naturally occur to any one who reads this book why this is so. The poets could be represented in a single volume with a greater degree of ease than any of their . . .

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