A Course in Russian History--The Seventeenth Century

A Course in Russian History--The Seventeenth Century

A Course in Russian History--The Seventeenth Century

A Course in Russian History--The Seventeenth Century

Synopsis

"Vasili O. Kliuchevsky (1841-1911), professor of history at Moscow University, was the most eminent Russian historian of his day - a pathbreaking scholar, a spellbinding lecturer, an engaging stylist, and a great synthesizer whose works have stood the test of time. In The Seventeenth Century, the third volume of his Course in Russian History, Kliuchevsky takes Russia from the confused events of the Time of Troubles and the rise of the Romanov dynasty to the accession of Peter the Great. As Kliuchevsky tells this dramatic story, he traces the widening cultural divide between old Russia and its emergent aristocracy as well as the ambivalent relationship between Russia and the West." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

In the annals of Russian historiography, Vasili Osipovich Kliuchevsky occupies a central and dominant position. Indeed, he deserves to be counted among the great historians of the world. Since his death more than fifty years ago his reputation and influence, although not always publicly acknowledged, have continued to grow both in his native land and abroad. His magnum opus, A Course in Russian History, is the only multivolume history of Russia that has been translated into English. The Russian original has been reprinted twice in the Soviet Union, and when, after Stalin's death, a project was begun to publish the collected works of prerevolutionary historians, it was only natural that Kliuchevsky was the first to be so honored. Until very recently some of his former students occupied important positions in the Soviet historical profession, and others, like Sir Bernard Pares at London and M. M. Karpovich at Harvard, imbued a generation of English and American undergraduates with the spirit of his work. What makes Kliuchevsky a figure of such enduring interest?

For more than three decades before the First World War, Kliuchevsky's brilliant lectures packed the main auditorium of Moscow University and inspired some of the best historical brains of the succeeding generation. The beauty of his language and the power of his ideas held his audience spellbound. In a flash, this unprepossessing little man, looking more like a deacon than a professor, with his high-pitched voice, his stutter, and . . .

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