Patterns in Modern Drama: Ibsen, Chekhov, Galsworthy, O'Neill, Kelly, Thurber, Nugent, Hellman

Patterns in Modern Drama: Ibsen, Chekhov, Galsworthy, O'Neill, Kelly, Thurber, Nugent, Hellman

Patterns in Modern Drama: Ibsen, Chekhov, Galsworthy, O'Neill, Kelly, Thurber, Nugent, Hellman

Patterns in Modern Drama: Ibsen, Chekhov, Galsworthy, O'Neill, Kelly, Thurber, Nugent, Hellman

Excerpt

Of this collection of plays the primary purpose is to provide for college students on the freshman and sophomore levels the texts of seven plays that are well established in the repertory of the contemporary theater, that are representative of the main currents in drama from Ibsen to the present day, and that will furnish incentive to discussion of the patterns and ideas giving chief vitality to the twentieth- century theater.

The teeming activity of the European and American theater in the first half of this century has produced plays of bewildering variety. For this reason, any collection attempting to make a historical treatment of modern drama could hardly confine itself to as few plays as this volume contains. Moreover, the principle of selection would have to be markedly different. In the following collection the development of modern drama as a whole and the complicated web of interrelation between Continental and American drama can merely be suggested. The strictly "experimental" aspects of the modern theater have had to be excluded almost entirely. Nevertheless, the plays presented here should lay the foundation for further study of modern drama by providing for the student who is not already widely acquainted with literature of the stage an opportunity to study some of the basic dramatic forms that can be most profitably treated and most easily understood.

On the assumption that the student who has seen and read relatively few plays will be attracted first by the feelings and ideas expressed in the drama rather than by anything so abstract as form, an effort has been made to select as many plays as possible that will stimulate discussion. Ibsen's ideas of political liberalism, Miss Hellman's presentation of an aspect of capitalism, the opinion of Messrs. Thurber and Nugent concerning the intelligence quotient of the college-bred American, Galsworthy's treatment of the difficulties of humanitarianism--all suggest lively issues. On the other hand, problems in charac-

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.