Professional Personnel for the City of New York: Report of the Study of Professional, Technical, and Managerial Manpower Needs of the City of New York

Professional Personnel for the City of New York: Report of the Study of Professional, Technical, and Managerial Manpower Needs of the City of New York

Professional Personnel for the City of New York: Report of the Study of Professional, Technical, and Managerial Manpower Needs of the City of New York

Professional Personnel for the City of New York: Report of the Study of Professional, Technical, and Managerial Manpower Needs of the City of New York

Excerpt

A National commission of civic leaders recently completed a study of emerging personnel requirements and the manpower outlook for local governments all over the country. It concluded that (1) personnel systems are lagging badly in the face of a deepening national scarcity of administrative and professional talent and rapidly increasing burdens on local government as a consequence of metropolitan growth; and (2) drastic measures will be required to attract, retain, and develop the services of public personnel, adequate in numbers and in skills, to cope with the problems which lie ahead of municipalities in the next decade or two.

This book is an intensive counterpart study of the nation's largest municipal government, the City of New York. It examines the City's personnel system, with particular attention to its ability to recruit and retain employees at professional, technical, and managerial levels. The system is viewed critically but sympathetically; the problems are large, and there are no easy answers. But after thorough research the principal author and his associates have concluded that the City does face a crisis in staffing its essential services, a crisis which it is in the interest of everyone to have clearly understood. In the chapters that follow, the nature and origins of this crisis are set forth in detail, and recommendations are made which it is hoped will commend themselves to the city government and to all persons and organizations concerned with the City's welfare. The Brookings Institution publishes this volume in the belief that knowledge of this problem and possible solutions should be widely known and discussed in New York and in other cities facing similar problems.

The reader should understand the underlying assumptions and scope of this report. It assumes that in the next ten years present trends and . . .

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