Shakespeare as Collaborator

Shakespeare as Collaborator

Shakespeare as Collaborator

Shakespeare as Collaborator

Excerpt

This book, though it incorporates revised versions of five articles written during the past ten years, is based partly on four lectures delivered at Stratford-upon-Avon under the auspices of the University of Birmingham. I am indebted to Professor Terence Spencer, the Director of the Summer School in 1959, and also to Dr Louis B. Wright for enabling me to spend three happy and profitable months at the Folger Shakespeare Library. I have to thank Miss M. Barber for permission to quote from marginalia by the late Professor Una Ellis-Fermor.

The scope of the book is deliberately restricted. I have not attempted to deal with all the plays which publishers and critics have ascribed to Shakespeare, but only with those plays which, though excluded from the First Folio, show unmistakable traces of his hand, and with the lost play, Cardenio.

The classical demonstration of the presence of Shakespeare's hand in an apocryphal play is that of the late R. W. Chambers in Man's Unconquerable Mind. Few readers of that brilliant essay are left in any doubt that Shakespeare contributed at least one scene to Sir Thomas More. I have relied largely on similar methods in my attempt to prove that Shakespeare was partly responsible for Edward III and The Two Noble Kinsmen; but I have learnt also from R. B. Heilman This Great Stage and Magic in the Web . . .

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