The Economic Impact on Under-Developed Societies: Essays on International Investment and Social Change

The Economic Impact on Under-Developed Societies: Essays on International Investment and Social Change

The Economic Impact on Under-Developed Societies: Essays on International Investment and Social Change

The Economic Impact on Under-Developed Societies: Essays on International Investment and Social Change

Excerpt

The essays in this volume are linked together by the basic economic problem which in one way or another underlies all of them: that of the clash between the functional forces of modern industrialism and the rapidly disintegrating indigenous economies of communities governed by forms of social organization unable to yield the living standards increasingly being demanded by all the peoples of the world. Thus all the essays deal with some aspect of the twin processes of disintegration and re-integration: with the disappearance of old structural economic patterns and the challenging need arising therefrom to find means of forming new wholes of social and economic endeavour.

The economist who investigates these processes finds his path strewn with concepts which are frequently an obstruction rather than an aid to his studies. I have therefore included in Part I of this volume essays which examine the conceptual aspects of the problem, and have grouped those which apply these concepts to Africa in Part II.

With the exceptions mentioned below the essays are reprinted as first published but they have been revised to avoid unnecessary duplication, and I have made minor alterations where necessary.

'The Concept of Colonization' was delivered as an Inaugural Lecture before the University of Oxford and is reprinted by kind permission of the Oxford University Press. The second essay first appeared under the title 'Some Conceptual Aspects of Technical Change' in a symposium published in the International Social Science Bulletin, Volume IV, No. 2, Unesco, 1952, to the editors of which I am grateful for permission to reprint the essay here. The third essay incorporates most of two articles. The first was entitled '"Psychic" and "Accounting" Concepts of Income and Welfare' and was published in Oxford Economic Papers (New Series), Volume IV, No. 1, February 1952, and is reprinted here with kind permission of the Oxford University Press and the editors of Oxford Economic Papers. The other article on which the . . .

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